WE’RE HISTORY Contributors

Aaron Astor

Aaron Astor

Aaron Astor, is Associate Professor of History at Maryville College in Maryville, Tennessee. He is the author of Rebels on the Border: Civil War, Emancipation and the Reconstruction of Kentucky and Missouri, 1860-1872 and The Civil War Along Tennessee’s Cumberland Plateau. He contributed several articles to the New York Times Disunion series, and is currently working on a book on the 1860 election at the grassroots from the perspective of four distinct American communities in Vermont, Ohio, Tennessee and Mississippi.

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Adam Rathge

Adam Rathge

Adam Rathge is a Ph.D. candidate in American History at Boston College. His dissertation examines a century of cannabis regulation in the United States between 1840 and 1940. He has previously served as a Graduate Fellow with the Clough Center for The Study of Constitutional Democracy and was a recipient of the Ferenc Gyorgyey Research Travel Grant from Yale University’s Harvey Cushing/John Hay Whitney Medical Library. He is currently a Contributing Editor with Points: The Blog of the Alcohol and Drugs History Society.

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Alan Rogers

Alan Rogers

Alan Rogers teaches U.S. Constitutional and Legal History at Boston College. His recent books include Murder and the Death Penalty in Massachusetts and The Child Cases: How America's Religious Exemption Laws Harm Children. On a sometimes happier note, he is a huge BC football fan.

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Alexis McCrossen

Alexis McCrossen

Alexis McCrossen, Professor of History at Southern Methodist University, is a cultural historian interested in temporal regimes and practices. Her blog, History of the New Year, draws on her current research. She is the author of Marking Modern Times: Clocks, Watches and Other Timekeepers in American Life (2013) and Holy Day, Holiday: The American Sunday (2000).

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Andrew Lipsett

Andrew Lipsett

Andrew Lipsett teaches United States History at Billerica Memorial High School in Billerica, MA. His interests include race, identity, and membership, and he blogs about history, memory, and memorialization at Graves of Note.

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Anna Gibson Holloway & Jonathan W. White

Anna Gibson Holloway & Jonathan W. White

Anna Gibson Holloway is the National Park Service’s maritime historian with the Park History Program in Washington, D.C. She holds a Ph.D. in history from the College of William & Mary, and is a leading expert on the Civil War ironclad USS Monitor. Her current research focuses on the Battle of Hampton Roads in popular culture, the Oyster Wars of the lower Chesapeake Bay, and nineteenth-century marine salvage firms. And yes, those do all go together. Sort of. Jonathan W. White is associate professor of American Studies at Christopher Newport University and a senior fellow with CNU’s Center for American Studies. He serves on the Board of Directors of the Abraham Lincoln Association, is Vice President of the Abraham Lincoln Institute, and serves on the Ford’s Theatre Advisory Council. His recent book, Emancipation, the Union Army, and the Reelection of Abraham Lincoln, was selected by Civil War Monitor as one of the best books of 2014, was a Finalist for both the Lincoln Prize and the Jefferson Davis Prize, and won the Abraham Lincoln Institute's 2015 Book Prize. Check out his website at www.jonathanwhite.org/.

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Anne Twitty

Anne Twitty

Anne Twitty is an assistant professor of history at the University of Mississippi, where she specializes in the history of slavery, law, and nineteenth-century America more broadly. Her forthcoming book with Cambridge University Press, Before Dred Scott: Slavery and Legal Culture in the American Confluence, 1787-1857, uses the collection of nearly 300 freedom suits filed in the St. Louis circuit court to construct a legal history of slavery and slaveholding in the Ohio, Mississippi, and Missouri river valleys. Her next project will explore the efficacy of gradual emancipation statutes adopted in the aftermath of the American Revolution.

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Ben Railton

Ben Railton

Ben Railton is Associate Professor of English and Coordinator of American Studies at Fitchburg State University. He's working to create public American Studies scholarship and to impact our collective memories and narratives, as evidenced by his books (most recently The Chinese Exclusion Act: What It Can Teach Us about America), his daily AmericanStudies blog, and many other ongoing projects.

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Benjamin L. Carp

Benjamin L. Carp

Benjamin L. Carp holds the Daniel M. Lyons Chair of American History as associate professor of early American history at Brooklyn College of the City University of New York. He is the author of Defiance of the Patriots: The Boston Tea Party and the Making of America (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2010), which won the Society of the Cincinnati Cox Book Prize in 2013; and Rebels Rising: Cities and the American Revolution (New York: Oxford University Press, 2007).

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Benjamin T. Arrington

Benjamin T. Arrington

Benjamin Todd Arrington is a career historian living in Ohio. He holds a Ph.D. in history from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and studies American political history with an emphasis on the Civil War era and the early Republican Party.

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Bill Kelson

Bill Kelson

Bill Kelson is a Ph.D. candidate and research assistant in the history department at the University of Georgia. He studies arcane topics like banking systems, political economy, and the history of world trade. Over drinks, though, you might be able to get him to open up about his love of folk music and good food.

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Brian Bixby

Brian Bixby

Brian Bixby grew up in New England and never quite managed to leave. He studies nineteenth century American culture, particularly tourism and religion. But he frequently takes time out to impersonate a nineteenth century statesman, teach courses outside of his specialty, and write fiction. Because history should be fun as well as educational.

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Brian Bunk

Brian Bunk

Brian D. Bunk is senior lecturer in history at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. His early research focused on Modern Spanish history and his book Ghosts of Passion: Martyrdom, Gender, and the Origins of the Spanish Civil War appeared in 2007. His recent work examines the history of sport in the United States with an emphasis on boxing and soccer. Articles on these topics have been published in the Journal of Sport History, Sport in History, and Sport in Society. He is also the creator and host of the Soccer History USA podcast, a monthly program examining the history of soccer in the United States.

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Bruce E. Baker

Bruce E. Baker

Bruce E. Baker is a lecturer in American history at Newcastle University. His forthcoming book, co-authored with Barbara Hahn, is The Cotton Kings: Capitalism and Corruption in Turn-of-the-Century New York and New Orleans (Oxford University Press, 2015).

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Caitlin Flanagan and Jonathan D. Cohen

Caitlin Flanagan and Jonathan D. Cohen

Jonathan D. Cohen is a PhD Candidate in the Corcoran Department of History at the University of Virginia. His dissertation, For a Dollar and a Dream: State Lotteries and American Inequality, examines the rise of state lotteries in economic, religious, political, and cultural context of the late twentieth century United States. He is the co-editor of All In: Gambling in the Twentieth Century United States (forthcoming, University of Nevada Press). ​Caitlin Flanagan is a Jefferson Scholar at the University of Virginia, where she is pursuing her B.A. She in interested in intersection of political and intellectual history, with particular attention to religion in modern America.

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Calvin Schermerhorn

Calvin Schermerhorn

Calvin Schermerhorn is Head of History and an associate professor in Arizona State University's School of Historical, Philosophical, and Religious Studies. He is author most recently of The Business of Slavery and the Rise of American Capitalism, 1815-1860 (Yale University Press, 2015), and is now working on a book on slavery and African American life from the Revolution to Reconstruction.

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Carole Emberton

Carole Emberton

Carole Emberton is Associate Professor of History at the University at Buffalo who specializes in the Civil War Era. She is the author of Beyond Redemption: Race, Violence, and the American South after the Civil War (University of Chicago Press, 2013) and is currently working on a book about the memories of emancipation among ex-slaves. Carole has also contributed to the New York Times “Disunion” series as well as History News Network.

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Christopher Bonner

Christopher Bonner

Christopher Bonner is an Assistant Professor of History at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is at work on a manuscript that examines black activists' work to create American citizenship before the passage of the Fourteenth Amendment. Originally from Chesapeake, VA, he earned his B.A. from Howard University and Ph.D. from Yale University.

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Colin McConarty

Colin McConarty

Colin McConarty is a Ph.D. student in the Boston College History Department. He studies U.S. political history, especially its tendency for recurrence. Before returning to grad school, he spent two years living and teaching in Selma, Alabama.

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Craig Gallagher

Craig Gallagher

Craig Gallagher is a Ph.D. Candidate in History at Boston College. He is writing a dissertation on Scots in the American colonies prior to the Anglo-Scots Union of 1707, but loves all aspects of colonial American history. He’s British in origin and considers this enough to claim a different perspective on everything from Jamestown to the War of 1812.

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Cynthia Lynn Lyerly

Cynthia Lynn Lyerly

Cynthia Lynn Lyerly, a native North Carolinian, teaches and writes on race, gender, and religion at Boston College. She is a student of classic cinema, a sucker for apocalyptic B movies, and is hard at work on a biography of Thomas Dixon, Jr.

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Daniel Burge

Daniel Burge

Daniel Burge is a PhD candidate at the University of Alabama. He holds a master’s degree from University of Maryland, Baltimore County and is currently working on his dissertation, which examines opposition to manifest destiny and the ways in which the opponents of manifest destiny appealed to the American public, beginning in the Oregon Debate of 1846 and ending in the attempt to annex Santo Domingo (1872). He is interested in opposition to imperialism, broadly defined, and especially how individuals utilized humor to offset and counteract the arguments of the imperialists.

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Daniel R. Weinfeld

Daniel R. Weinfeld

Daniel R. Weinfeld, an attorney in New York, is the author of The Jackson County War: Reconstruction and Resistance in Post-Civil War Florida and articles that have appeared in the Florida Historical Quarterly and Southern Jewish History. Most recently, he was editor of T. Thomas Fortune's After War Times: An African American Childhood in Reconstruction-Era Florida. He blogs on his history interests at Blood and Oranges.

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Danielle McGuire

Danielle McGuire

Danielle McGuire is the award-winning author of At the Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape and Resistance - a New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Power (Knopf, 2010). She is an Associate Professor of History at Wayne State University and is currently writing a book about the 1967 Algiers Motel murders in Detroit.

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David Chappell

David Chappell

David Chappell is author of Inside Agitators: White Southerners in the Civil Rights Movement (Johns Hopkins, 1994), A Stone of Hope: Prophetic Religion and the Death of Jim Crow (North Carolina, 2004), and Waking from the Dream: The Struggle for Civil Rights in the Shadow of Martin Luther King (Random House, 2014). His articles, essays, and reviews have appeared in The New York Times, Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, Newsday, The Raleigh News and Observer, The Nation On-Line, The World Policy Journal, Tempo (Rio de Janeiro), Sekai (Tokyo), In These Times, Books and Culture, The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Historically Speaking, The African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Journal of American Studies, Journal of the Historical Society, and The African American Review. He teaches history at the University of Oklahoma.

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DeAnna Beachley

DeAnna Beachley

DeAnna Beachley teaches U.S. History and Women's Studies at the College of Southern Nevada. She is currently working on a study of what happened to the National Woman's Party women who picketed the White House for the vote in 1917.

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Devin Pendas

Devin Pendas

Devin Pendas is a historian of Holocaust trials and international law. He is the author of The Frankfurt Auschwitz Trial, 1963-1965: Genocide, History, and the Limits of the Law and the forthcoming Law and Democracy: Transitional Justice in German Courts, 1945-1950, and is the editor or co-editor of several forthcoming books, including Political Trials in History and Theory. He works hard to maintain his faith in the rule of law in a world where it fails all too often.

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Don H. Doyle

Don H. Doyle

Don H. Doyle, author of The Cause of All Nations: An International History of the American Civil War (Basic Books, 2015), is McCausland Professor of History at the University of South Carolina.

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Douglas Egerton

Douglas Egerton

Douglas Egerton is professor of history at Le Moyne College. His recent books include Year of Meteors: Stephen Douglas, Abraham Lincoln, and the Election That Brought on the Civil War and The Wars of Reconstruction: The Brief, Violent History of America's Most Progressive Era.

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Edward Miller

Edward Miller

Edward "Ted" Miller is an Assistant Teaching Professor in the College of Professional Studies at Northeastern University. His research interests include the political and urban/suburban history of 20th century America. Dr. Miller focuses specifically on the rise of American conservatism. His first book Nut Country: Right Wing Dallas and the Birth of the Southern Strategy, was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2015. He is currently at work on his second book Sugar Daddy: A Life of Robert Welch, about the founder of the John Birch Society.

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Elaine Frantz Parsons

Elaine Frantz Parsons

Elaine Frantz Parsons is an associate professor of History at Duquesne University. Her book, The Ku-Klux Klan and the Reconstruction of American Culture (Forthcoming UNC Press, 2015) explores the rise and fall of the reconstruction-era Klan.

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Elizabeth Pingree

Elizabeth Pingree

Elizabeth Pingree is currently working toward her MA in history at Boston College, where she studies late nineteenth and early twentieth-century US history. She focuses specifically on labor, race, and immigration, and is interested in the impact industrialization had on rural people, both those who lived in rural areas, as well as those who immigrated to urban centers.

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Eric Arnesen

Eric Arnesen

Eric Arnesen teaches history at The George Washington University, where he is also the Executive Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs in its Columbian College of Arts and Sciences. A specialist in the history of race, labor, politics, and civil rights, he is the author of Brotherhoods of Color: Black Railroad Workers and the Struggle for Equality and Waterfront Workers of New Orleans: Race, Class, and Politics, 1863-1923 (Oxford University Press, 1991), and editor or co-editor of five other books. He currently co-chairs the Washington History Seminar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center of Scholars.

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Eric Rauchway

Eric Rauchway

Eric Rauchway is a professor of history at the University of California, Davis, and the author of five books on US history. His newest book is The Money-Makers: How Roosevelt and Keynes Ended the Depression, Defeated Fascism, and Secured a Prosperous Peace (Basic Books, 2015).

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Erica Ball

Erica Ball

Erica L. Ball is currently Professor of American Studies and Chair of African American Studies at California State University, Fullerton. Her first book, To Live an Antislavery Life: Personal Politics and the Antebellum Black Middle Class (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2012), interrogates the links between early nineteenth-century African American advice literature, antislavery activism, and northern free black processes of middle-class self-fashioning. She has recently completed co-editing with Kellie Carter Jackson a collection of scholarly essays on the iconic 1977 television miniseries Roots. Entitled Reconsidering Roots: Race, Politics and Memory, the volume will be published by the University of Georgia Press in spring 2017. Ball is currently working on a cultural history of Slavery in the Modern American Imagination and study of beauty culture and black women's self-fashioning at the turn-of-the-twentieth century. In fall 2016, Erica L. Ball will join the faculty at Occidental College as Professor of American Studies.

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Felix Harcourt

Felix Harcourt

Felix Harcourt is a lecturer in history at Georgia State University. He is the author of The Most Picturesque Element: American Culture in the Age of the Ku Klux Klan (forthcoming from University of Chicago Press) and assistant editor of two volumes of the collected papers of Eleanor Roosevelt.

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George C. Rable

George C. Rable

George C. Rable is the Charles G. Summersell Chair in Southern History at the University of Alabama. His books include Civil Wars: Women and the Crisis of Southern Nationalism (1989), The Confederate Republic: A Revolution Against Politics (1994), Fredericksburg! Fredericksburg! (2002), and God’s Almost Chosen Peoples: A Religious History of the American Civil War (2010).

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Glenn Brasher

Glenn Brasher

Glenn David Brasher is a history instructor at the University of Alabama. His book, The Peninsula Campaign & the Necessity of Emancipation (UNC Press, 2012) won the 2013 Wiley Silver Award from the Center for Civil War Research at the University of Mississippi.

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Glenna Matthews

Glenna Matthews

Glenna Matthews is an independent scholar with a doctorate in American history from Stanford. After giving up tenure at Oklahoma State University to return to her native state, she’s taught at several of the leading universities in California as a visiting associate professor. Her first book was Just a Housewife: The Rise and Fall of Domesticity in America. She also collects cookbooks.

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Greg Flemming

Greg Flemming

Greg Flemming is the author of At the Point of a Cutlass, which tells for the first time the complete story of a New England fisherman who was captured by pirates and then escaped and lived as a castaway on an uninhabited Caribbean island. Greg is a former journalist with a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. A New England native, he lives with his family in New England. At the Point of a Cutlass is Greg’s first book.

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Gregory Smithers

Gregory Smithers

Gregory Smithers is associate professor of history at Virginia Commonwealth University. He specializes in Native American and African American histories since the late eighteenth century. His most recent book is The Cherokee Diaspora: An Indigenous History of Migration, Resettlement, and Identity (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015).

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Hasan Jeffries

Hasan Jeffries

Hasan Kwame Jeffries is associate professor of history at The Ohio State University. He received his Ph.D. in American history with a specialization in African American history from Duke University in 2002. He is the author of Bloody Lowndes: Civil Rights and Black Power in Alabama’s Black Belt (NYU Press, 2009). Hasan resides in Columbus, Ohio with his wife Rashida and daughters Asha, Aliyana, and A’laila. They travel as often as possible to the South to visit friends, and home to Brooklyn to visit family.

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Heather Cox Richardson

Heather Cox Richardson

Historian. Author. Professor. Budding Curmudgeon. Heather Cox Richardson studies the contrast between image and reality in America, especially in politics.

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Hidetaka Hirota

Hidetaka Hirota

Hidetaka Hirota is a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Society of Fellows in the Humanities and a lecturer in the History Department and the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race at Columbia University. His research focuses on the history of the Atlantic World, the nineteenth-century United States, and American immigration. He is currently working on a book about the origins of American immigration restriction.

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Hugh Willett

Hugh Willett

Plumbing the depths of popular music, Hugh Willett is a writer at large. His first memory involved Jimmy Cliff and a Walkman, and he's been devoted to exploring the stories behind the music ever since.

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Ian Delahanty

Ian Delahanty

Ian Delahanty is a postdoctoral fellow at Boston College and soon-to-be Assistant Professor of History at Springfield College. His research focuses on Irish Americans' involvement in the Civil War and the intertwined histories of nationalism and abolitionism in Ireland and America.

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James M. O'Toole

James M. O'Toole

James M. O'Toole is the Clough Professor of History at Boston College. He is the author of Passing for White: Race, Religion, and the Healy Family, 1820-1920 (University of Massachusetts Press, 2002).

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Jennifer Pemberton

Jennifer Pemberton

Jennifer Pemberton writes about politics and the environment from her home in Northern Utah. She holds an MFA in creative writing from the University of Alabama and is currently leading a public radio collaboration, reporting on gender parity in Western politics.

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Jim Downs

Jim Downs

Jim Downs is an Andrew W. Mellon New Directions fellow at Harvard University and an associate professor of history at Connecticut College. He is the author of Stand By Me: The Forgotten History of Gay Liberation (Basic Books, 2016) and Sick from Freedom: African-American Illness and Suffering during the Civil War and Reconstruction (Oxford U.P. 2012).

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Joel Wolfe

Joel Wolfe

Joel Wolfe is Professor of History at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He’s the author of Working Women, Working Men: São Paulo and the Rise of Brazil’s Industrial Working Class and Autos and Progress: The Brazilian Search for Modernity. He’s writing The Global Twenties: Life, Work, and Trade in the Western Hemisphere in the 1920s. His not so secret passion is his “History of Baseball” class that he teaches every year at UMass.

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John Garrison Marks

John Garrison Marks

John Garrison Marks is a doctoral candidate in history at Rice University interested in race, slavery, and identity in the Atlantic World. His dissertation examines racial identity among free people of color in Charleston, South Carolina and Cartagena de Indias during the Age of Revolutions.

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John W. Mackey

John W. Mackey

John Mackey is Senior Lecturer and Associate Chair of the Social Sciences Division of the College of General Studies at Boston University. He teaches courses in social theory, western and Chinese history, and American foreign policy. He is a contributing author of The Modernization of the Western World: A Society Transformed (2012).

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Jonathan Bryant

Jonathan Bryant

Jonathan M. Bryant writes about the nineteenth-century American South and American legal history. He is the author of How Curious a Land: Conflict and Change in Greene County Georgia, 1850-1885 and Dark Places of the Earth: The Voyage of the Slave Ship Antelope. He teaches at Georgia Southern University.

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Jonathan Rees

Jonathan Rees

Jonathan Rees is Professor of History at Colorado State University - Pueblo. He is the author of Refrigeration Nation: A History of Ice, Appliances and Enterprise in America (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013) and the forthcoming Refrigerator (Bloomsbury).

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Joseph M. Adelman

Joseph M. Adelman

Joseph M. Adelman is an assistant professor of history at Framingham State University. A historian of media, communication, and politics in the Atlantic world, he is currently at work on a book tentatively entitled, Revolutionary Networks: The Business of Printing and the Production of American Politics, 1763-1789. He blogs regularly for The Junto.

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Joseph M. Thompson

Joseph M. Thompson

Joseph M. Thompson is a doctoral candidate in the University of Virginia’s Corcoran Department of History. His dissertation, “Sounding Southern: Music, Militarism, and the Making of the Sunbelt South,” uses popular music to analyze the cultural impact of the military-industrial complex since the 1950s.

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Joshua D. Rothman

Joshua D. Rothman

Joshua D. Rothman is Professor of History and Chair of the Department of History at the University of Alabama. He is the author, most recently, of Flush Times and Fever Dreams: A Story of Capitalism and Slavery in the Age of Jackson (2012), and is currently working on a book about the slave traders Isaac Franklin, John Armfield, and Rice Ballard.

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Keisha N. Blain

Keisha N. Blain

Keisha N. Blain is an Assistant Professor of History at the University of Iowa. Her research and teaching interests include black internationalism, radical politics, and global feminisms. She is currently completing her first book, which examines how black nationalist women engaged in national and global politics from the early twentieth century to the 1950s. She completed a B.A. in History and Africana Studies from Binghamton University (SUNY) and a Ph.D. in History from Princeton University.

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Kevin M. Levin

Kevin M. Levin

Kevin M. Levin teaches history at Gann Academy near Boston. He is the author of Remembering the Battle of the Crater: War as Murder and is currently at work on a study of the myth of the black Confederate soldier. He can be found online at his website, Civil War Memory.

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Kevin Waite

Kevin Waite

Kevin Waite is a PhD candidate at the University of Pennsylvania, where he’s writing a dissertation on proslavery visions of empire in the Pacific world. When not tracking down slaveholders in 1850s California, he enjoys trekking up mountains and reading about the history of mountaineering.

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Kimberly Wilmot Voss

Kimberly Wilmot Voss

Kimberly Wilmot Voss, PhD, is a tenured associate professor of journalism at the University of Central Florida, where she teaches media law and journalism history and coordinates the journalism program. She is the author of The Food Section: Newspaper Women and the Culinary Community (Rowman & Littlefield, 2014) and a co-author of Mad Men & Working Women: Feminist Perspectives on Historical Power, Resistance, and Otherness (Peter Lang, 2014). She is the winner of the 2014 Carol DeMasters Award for Service to Food Journalism given by the Association of Food Journalism.

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Larry Gragg

Larry Gragg

Larry Gragg is Curators’ Teaching Professor in History and Political Science at Missouri University of Science and Technology. He is the author of Bright Light City: Las Vegas in Popular Culture, 1905-2005 (University Press of Kansas, 2013) and his biography Benjamin “Bugsy” Siegel: The Gangster, The Flamingo, and The Making of Las Vegas will be published in early 2015 by Praeger. While not a compulsive gambler, he has become a compulsive visitor to Las Vegas where he has made over 40 research trips to the Special Collections at the Lied Library at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

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Leif Fredrickson

Leif Fredrickson

Leif Fredrickson is a PhD candidate at the University of Virginia and a Mellon Fellow at the Digital Scholarship Lab at the University of Richmond. His dissertation is titled “The Age of Lead: Environmental Health, Metropolitan Change, and Urban Underdevelopment in Baltimore, 1900-2000.”

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Lisa Lindquist Dorr

Lisa Lindquist Dorr

Lisa Lindquist Dorr is the author of White Women, Rape and the Power of Race in Virginia, 1900-1960 (UNC 2004). She is an associate dean in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Alabama and is currently writing a book about the smuggling of booze from Cuba to the southern coast during Prohibition.

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Lynn Downey

Lynn Downey

Lynn Downey writes on topics ranging from the history of jeans, the treatment of tuberculosis in California, American art pottery, and the history and culture of Arizona dude ranch towns. She was the Levi Strauss & Co. Historian from 1989 to 2014 and her biography of Levi Strauss will be published by the University of Massachusetts Press in the fall of 2016. She is currently working on a history of the Arequipa Sanatorium through the lens of her grandmother’s experience there.

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Manisha Sinha

Manisha Sinha

Manisha Sinha is Professor and Graduate Program Director of Afro-American Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She was born in India and received her doctorate from Columbia University, where her dissertation was nominated for the Bancroft Prize. She is currently working on a co-authored history of the South, to be published by the University of North Carolina Press. She is the author of The Slave's Cause: A History of Abolition and The Counterrevolution of Slavery: Politics and Ideology in Antebellum South Carolina.

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Mark R. Cheathem

Mark R. Cheathem

Mark R. Cheathem is an associate professor of history at Cumberland University. His books include Andrew Jackson and the Rise of the Democrats (due out in March 2015) and Andrew Jackson, Southerner, which won the 2013 Tennessee History Book Award. He is currently completing a new book entitled The Log Cabin and Hard Cider Campaign of 1840: Politics as Entertainment in Antebellum America.

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Martha S. Jones

Martha S. Jones

Martha S. Jones is Presidential Bicentennial Professor at the University of Michigan where she teaches history, African American studies, and law, and directs the Michigan Law Program in Race, Law & History. She is the author of Birthright Citizens: A History of Race and Rights in Antebellum America, forthcoming in 2017 from Cambridge University Press.

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Mary Sarah Bilder

Mary Sarah Bilder

Mary Sarah Bilder teaches law and American legal history at Boston College Law School, where she is Professor and the Michael and Helen Lee Distinguished Scholar. Her most recent book is a biography of Madison's Notes, Madison's Hand: Revising the Constitutional Convention (Harvard University Press 2015). She still thinks of herself as someone from Wisconsin.

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Matthew Hulbert

Matthew C. Hulbert

Matthew C. Hulbert is a cultural and military historian of nineteenth-century America. He is the co-editor of The Civil War Guerrilla: Unfolding the Black Flag in History, Memory, and Myth (Kentucky, 2015) and the author of The Ghosts of Guerrilla Memory: How Civil War Bushwhackers became Gunslingers in the American West (University of Georgia Press, 2016).

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Melanie Gustafson

Melanie Gustafson

Melanie Gustafson teaches at the University of Vermont and has written about the woman suffrage movement and women in partisan politics.

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Micah Schneider

Micah Schneider

Micah Schneider is a historian masquerading as a math instructor. He completed his Master's degree in History at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where he studied Early American History and Public History. He still lives and works in western Massachusetts.

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Michael & Whitney Landis

Michael & Whitney Landis

Michael Landis is an Assistant Professor of History at Tarleton State University and is the author of Northern Men with Southern Loyalties: The Democratic Party and the Sectional Crisis (Cornell, 2014). Whitney Landis is a commissioning editor at The History Press and has an MA in history from The George Washington University. They live with their two dogs in Granbury, Texas. They watch lots of movies.

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Michael Green

Michael Green

Michael Green is an associate professor of history at UNLV. In 2015, the University of Nevada Press will publish his Nevada: A History of the Silver State. He also is the author of Lincoln and the Election of 1860 (Southern Illinois University Press) and other works on the nineteenth century and the American West.

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Michael Keenan Gutierrez

Michael Keenan Gutierrez

Michael Keenan Gutierrez is the author of The Trench Angel (October 2015) and earned degrees from UCLA, the University of Massachusetts, and the University of New Hampshire. He teaches writing at the University of North Carolina.

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Michael Landis

Michael Landis

Michael Todd Landis is an Assistant Professor of History at Tarleton State University. He is the author of Northern Men with Southern Loyalties: The Democratic Party and the Sectional Crisis (Cornell, 2014).

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Michael McLean

Michael McLean

Michael McLean is a Ph.D. student at Boston College. He grapples with the violence in American history through the lens of Native American and enslaved communities. In his free time, he studies the Lakota language and leads outdoor backpacking and rock climbing trips.

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Michael Weaver

Michael Weaver

Michael Weaver is the author of Guard Wars: The 28th Infantry Division in World War II (Indiana Univ. Press, 2010). He is an associate professor of history at the Air Force's Air Command and Staff College where he specializes in World War II, the Vietnam War, and Cold War history. Mike is a 2002 alumnus of Temple University.

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Mimi Cowan

Mimi Cowan

Mimi Cowan lives in Chicago and teaches American History and Urban Studies at Lake Forest College. Her doctoral dissertation examines immigrants' responses to nativism in nineteenth century Chicago.

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Oscar Winberg

Oscar Winberg

Oscar Winberg is a Ph.D. Candidate at the history department of Åbo Akademi University, in Finland. He is working on a dissertation on politics and television entertainment in 1970s America, focusing on the sitcom All in the Family. His research interests include media history, history of conservatism, and modern political history. He is also the host of the academic politics podcast Campaign Context.

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Patricia Marroquin Norby & C. Joseph Genetin-Pilawa

Patricia Marroquin Norby & C. Joseph Genetin-Pilawa

Patricia Marroquin Norby (Purépecha/Nde) is Director of the D'Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian and Indigenous Studies at the Newberry Library in Chicago, Illinois. She is an award-winning legal activist, artist, and scholar of American Indian art and visual culture. She holds a PhD in American Studies from the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities and an MFA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her writing draws critical connections between art making techniques, environmental politics, and the health of American Indian women artists. C. Joseph Genetin-Pilawa is assistant professor of history at George Mason University. His current work focuses on tensions between the lived and commemorative Native American spaces and histories in Washington D.C. His recent books include Crooked Paths to Allotment: The Fight Over Federal Indian Policy after the Civil War and Beyond Two Worlds: Critical Conversations on Language and Power in Native North America (as co-editor).

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Patrick Rael

Patrick Rael

Patrick Rael is Professor of History at Bowdoin College. His most recent book, Eighty-Eight Years: The Long Death of Slavery in the United States, 1777-1865 (University of Georgia Press, 2015), explores the Atlantic history of slavery to understand the exceptionally long period of time it took to end chattel bondage in America.

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Paul Ringel

Paul Ringel

Paul Ringel is Associate Professor of History at High Point University. He is the author of Commercializing Childhood: Children's Magazines, Urban Gentility, and the ideal of the American Child, 1823-1918 (2015). He is also the Director of the William Penn Project, a service learning initiative through which students explore the history of High Point's African-American high school during the Jim Crow era. His current research project is an exploration of the Royal Rooters, a group of celebrity baseball fans in early twentieth-century Boston.

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Paul Sutter

Paul Sutter

Paul S. Sutter is a Professor of History at the University of Colorado, Boulder, where he teaches modern U.S. history and environmental history. He is the author of Driven Wild: How the Fight against Automobiles Launched the Modern Wilderness Movement and, more recently, of Let Us Now Praise Famous Gullies: Providence Canyon and the Soils of the South. He is also Series Editor of Weyerhaeuser Environmental Books, which is published by the University of Washington Press.

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Peter Cole

Peter Cole

Peter Cole is a Professor of History at Western Illinois University. He is the author of Wobblies on the Waterfront: Interracial Unionism in Progressive Era Philadelphia and is currently at work on a book entitled Dockworker Power: Labor, Race & Technology in Durban and the San Francisco Bay Area. He has published extensively on labor history and politics.

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R. B. Bernstein

R. B. Bernstein

R. B. Bernstein teaches at City College of New York's Colin Powell School and New York Law School; his books include Thomas Jefferson (2003), The Founding Fathers Reconsidered (2009), the forthcoming The Education of John Adams, and the forthcoming The Founding Fathers: A Very Short Introduction, all from Oxford University Press.

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Rachel Shelden

Rachel Shelden

Rachel Shelden is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Oklahoma and the author of Washington Brotherhood: Politics, Social Life, and the Coming of the Civil War (University of North Carolina Press, 2013).

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Roger Lee Hall

Roger Lee Hall

Roger Lee Hall is a musicologist and composer who has researched and performed music from earlier America for over forty years. He is currently Director of the Center for American Music preservation (CAMP) as well as the New England Music Archive (NEMA). Also, he is Album Producer for the American Music Recordings Collection (AMRC). For more about his background, see his official site: http://www.rogerleehall.com

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Ryan Green

Ryan Green

Ryan Green was born and raised in Bakersfield, California. After a brief stint in the Air Force he received his B.A. from the University of California Davis. Currently a Ph.D. student at Boston College, he studies the history of American foreign policy with a focus on death and dying in the American military.

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Sarah Katherine Mergel

Sarah Katherine Mergel

Sarah Katherine Mergel is an associate professor of history at Dalton State College in Northwest Georgia. She is the author of Conservative Intellectuals and Richard Nixon: Rethinking the Rise of the Right. She is passionate about researching, writing, and teaching on political, intellectual, and diplomatic history since the end of the Civil War. When not studying history, she loves anything about classical music (especially when it involves playing the oboe).

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Sarah Nitenson

Sarah Nitenson

Sarah recently completed her Master's degree in History at Boston College. She studied colonial and Revolutionary history, with a particular focus on the memory of the American Revolution. You can currently find her working at a law firm in the North End in Boston, where everyday she is equally tempted by amazing cannolis and Revolutionary War monuments.

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Scott Poole

Scott Poole

Scott Poole is a Professor of History at the College of Charleston. He is the author of the award-winning Monsters in America (2011). His most recent book is Vampira: Dark Goddess of Horror, a cultural history of the cult figure and of mid-century America. He is working on a project on H.P. Lovecraft.

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Serena Zabin

Serena Zabin

Serena Zabin is Professor of History at Carleton College. Her most recent book is Dangerous Economies: Status and Commerce in Imperial New York (University of Pennsylvania Press 2009), and she is currently writing a very new history of the Boston Massacre.

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Stephen Kantrowitz

Stephen Kantrowitz

Stephen Kantrowitz is Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the author of several books, including Ben Tillman and the Reconstruction of White Supremacy.

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Steven Cromack

Steven Cromack

Historian. Teacher. James Madison Fellow. Steven Cromack teaches high school social studies in the Boston suburbs, lives for the moment, and pursues Life itself.

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Thomas Apel

Thomas Apel

Thomas Apel teaches history at Menlo College in the San Francisco Bay Area. He studies the histories of science, disease, and the environment. His first book Feverish Bodies, Enlightened Minds: Science and the Yellow Fever Controversy in the Early American Republic is being published by the Stanford University Press (March 2016 release).

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Thomas J. Brown

Thomas J. Brown

Thomas J. Brown, professor of history at the University of South Carolina, is the author of Civil War Canon: Sites of Confederate Memory in South Carolina (2015) and the editor of Remixing the Civil War: Meditations on the Sesquicentennial (2011) and Reconstructions: New Perspectives on the Postbellum United States (2006).

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Thomas Kidd

Thomas Kidd

Thomas S. Kidd is distinguished professor of history at Baylor University. His books include Patrick Henry: First Among Patriots (2011), and most recently, American Colonial History: Clashing Cultures and Faiths (2016).

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We're History

We're History

We're History Team. We’re History tells the story of how America became what it is today. Written and edited by scholars, it is real history, with all its triumphs, failures, twists, and ironies.

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